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How DAT Scans are Helping Those With Parkinson's

Until recently, doctors have had to rely on clinical evaluations and blood tests to identify Parkinson’s — a disease that affects one out of every 100 people above the age of 60. But despite even the best testing methods available, many doctors’ diagnosis was still inconclusive, as the symptoms of Parkinson’s mirror many other movement disorders. But recently, researchers have begun utilizing a Dopamine Transporter (DaT) Scan to help better identify Parkinson’s in people of all ages.

Neuroscience in the News: The Science Behind Forgiveness

Are you the type of person who finds it easy to forgive others? Or are you more inclined to hold a grudge? That question can be hard for many to answer, as deciding to forgive someone is usually based on a few questions: Did that person mean to cause me harm? What’s my relationship to that person? Have they ever wronged me before? A new study from the University of Vienna, in Australia, and Boston College, in Massachusetts, is hoping to determine exactly how the answer to those questions affects our brain at its most basic chemical level.

Brain Cancer and Diabetes: The Surprising Link Between The Two

While we all like to enjoy a few sweets from time to time, everyone knows that a diet high in sugar isn’t good for you. Not only can a high sugar diet lead to weight gain, high blood pressure, and diabetes, but it can also increase your risk of most cancers (especially colon, breast, and bladder). So researchers were surprised to learn that certain brain cancers, like glioma, were less common in people with diabetes and high blood sugar.

May is American Stroke Month: Stroke Prevention and Identification

Stroke is the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States. But despite the fact that close to 1 million people will suffer from a stroke this year, only 1 in 4 Americans can name at least one warning sign of a stroke. Early intervention is incredibly important for stroke victims, because the sooner they are treated, the less likely they are to suffer from long-term disabilities. In honor of American Stroke Month, here are some F.A.S.T facts you should know about strokes:

Sports Related Concussions and What To Do

With January bringing Winter Sports TBI Awareness into focus, listed here are a few ways to not only tell if you may be suffering from a concussion, but what your options are when seeking help:

A Comprehensive Guide to TBI’s

In light of National Winter Sports TBI Awareness Month, we wanted to highlight some of the key points in identifying a TBI and understanding what you can do should it occur:

MRI to Show When Concussed Athletes Should Return to Sports

Between motor vehicle crashes and sports, concussions affect millions yearly. With sports, in particular, decisions to clear athletes to go back to play are typically based on symptoms and cognitive and neurological test results. However a recent study, presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), has shown that while athletes may appear capable of returning to sports - they may still have abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) even after clinical recovery.

5 Brain Myths Debunked

You may have heard we only use a small percent of our brains or that playing classical music to babies can make them smarter - but are these and other common claims true? Find out below as we debunk some popular myths.

Nutrients for Brain Health

Genetics and exercise aren't the only things that play a role in brain health, diet is quite influential too. While researchers continue to conduct studies on the matter, results have started to pinpoint certain nutrients associated with improved cognitive function and memory.

The Effects of Stress on the Brain

In April we also recognize Stress Awareness Month- a national, cooperative effort to inform society about the dangers of stress, successful coping strategies, as well as harmful misconceptions. Stress can be defined as the brain’s response to any demand. It produces a hormone called cortisol, which in large amounts, is detrimental to many parts of the body. Researchers continue to study how elevated levels of cortisol can poorly affect learning and memory, the immune system, bone density, weight loss, cholesterol, heart disease, and more. And they’re finding out why- because stress and its accompanying cortisol production actually changes the structure of the brain over time.